LA Shrimp Soon to be Plentiful, Good Choice for Health

LaTer Direct Administrator - Monday, May 16, 2016
he spring shrimp season is set to open May 23, which means America’s favorite seafood will soon be plentiful and easy to add to our weekly menu.  Local shrimpers are hopeful large volumes of Gulf shrimp caught in Marshrimp boatch will translate to a great brown shrimp season in May and June.

“Consumers should know that fresh, wild caught Louisiana shrimp will soon be readily available,” said Thomas Hymel, LSU AgCenter/Louisiana Sea Grant extension agent, and director of the Louisiana Direct Seafood program.  “Lucky for us, more and more evidence points to the importance of seafood in a healthy diet.”

According to seafoodhealthfacts.org, health experts recommend eating a variety of seafood at least twice a week.  Nutritional benefits of seafood include:

•    A good source of high quality protein, that is easier to digest
•    Fewer calories compared to other protein dense foods.
•    Low levels of total and saturated fat, with most kinds of fish and shellfish containing less than 5 percent total fat.
•    A main source of omega-3 fatty acids (EPA) and docsahexaenoic acid (DHA)

These important fatty acids provide significant health benefits, like helping to build muscles and tissue and reducing the risk of heart disease in adults.  Just one 3 ounce serving of shrimp contains over 293 milligrams of omega-3 fatty acid.

Though fresh, wild caught Louisiana shrimp is easy to find, and is a good choice for your health, it is important to remember that not all seafood is created equal.  Domestic shrimp, and other seafood, is a better—and often safer—choice than some imports.  

Reports of shrimp refused entry into the U.S., due to antibiotics found in samples, as well as investigations into slave labor used in shrimp processing plants overseas, have some consumers concerned.

 “Most people don’t realize that 94 percent of our shrimp is imported, mainly from countries such as India, Thailand and Indonesia,” said Thomas Hymel, LSU AgCenter/Louisiana Sea Grant extension agent, and director of the Louisiana Direct Seafood program.  “But there is no need to abandon your love of shrimp, as you can take steps to make sure you know where your seafood comes from.  Carefully reading labels, especially the back of the product, for country of origin is one way.  Buying direct from fishermen, or a trusted local retailer, is another.”

LouisianaDirectSeafood.com, an initiative administered by Louisiana Sea Grant and LSU AgCenter, provides an online resource for consumers to connect with fishermen in four main coastal areas—CameronDelcambreLafourche-Terrebonne, and Southshore/New Orleans.   Each area has it’s own web site, where fishermen can post their most recent catch for sale, and how to contact them directly.  Facebook pages and e-newsletters for each region also serve to keep consumers in the know.

“There is a reason farm-to-table has become so popular,” said Hymel.  “People are looking to make a connection with their food, and with local producers.  Seafood fresh off the boat has nutritional benefits, as well as superior taste and texture.

“Though we’re talking up the opening of shrimp season, summer is a great time for all manner of fresh seafood, as crabs get fatter and many species of fish are running like red snapper, tuna, wahoo and king mackerel.  Even oysters are available and safe to eat thanks to time and temperature safety rules; plus a new method of off bottom oyster farming produces a delicious summer oyster.  How fortunate we are to have all this bounty at our fingertips.”

Catch Crabs, Earn Cash Reward

LaTer Direct Administrator - Tuesday, May 10, 2016
From NOLA.com

April 20, 2016

By Todd Masson

Crabbing in Louisiana's waters will not only provide you and your friends with a tasty meal, it could also put a little cash in your wallet. Nicholls State University is on a quest to learn more about the health and habits of the state's blue-crab population, and will be rewarding recreational and commercial crabbers who help in that endeavor.

Over the next two years, researchers at the school will tag and release as many as 15,000 female blue crabs in Louisiana waters and 30,000 Gulf-wide. The tags will appear on the backs of the crustaceans, and will be held in place by a wire that stretches from point to point.

Nicholls University tagged crabCrabbers who catch the tagged crabs and report the requested information will receive a check for $5 or $50, as well as information about where and when the crab was tagged.

Zachary Darnell, assistant professor at Nicholls' Department of Biological Sciences, said the project is the largest to his knowledge ever conducted in Louisiana waters.

"Blue crabs support a tremendously valuable fishery in Louisiana, but information on their movements and migration is lacking," he said. "We're mostly interested in how female crabs are moving through the estuaries and coastal waters of Louisiana -- when they're migrating, why they're migrating.

"We know that after the females mature and mate, they tend to stick in one area to feed and build up their energy stores, and then once they get ready to produce an egg mass, they start migrating down toward the coast, toward higher-salinity water, where they spawn. The eggs and larvae need that higher salinity."

Darnell said crabs migrate not by crawling or swimming, but by rising up in the water column and riding the falling tides. When the water turns around and begins to rise, the crabs simply move to the bottom and hold on until the tide starts to fall again.

"That saves them a lot of energy," he said.

In Louisiana, that migration seems to be a protracted affair, Darnell said.

"We know that up in the Chesapeake Bay, the vast majority of all females tend to migrate in the fall, fairly tightly clustered around the same time, but down here, it's probably much more spread out," he said.

10 fascinating blue crab facts

Here are some things you may not know about Louisiana's favorite crustacean.

The tags, Darnell said, should stay on the crabs throughout their lives.

"A lot of people ask, 'What about when they molt? Won't you lose the tags?' But once the females reach maturity, they really don't molt again after that," he said.

Researchers began tagging a couple of weeks ago, and to date, have tagged about 400 crabs, Darnell said. That number will climb rapidly throughout the spring and summer, he said.

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Todd Masson can be reached at tmasson@nola.com or 504.232.3054. 

Oyster Industry Workshop in Houma

LaTer Direct Administrator - Tuesday, November 18, 2014

A seasonal update for oyster boat captains and deck hands, brought to you be Louisiana Fisheries Forward; lunch provided.Louisiana Fisheries Forward logo

December 5, 2014
9:30 am – 11:30 am

JOIN US AT THE WORKSHOP
Bayou Terrebonne Waterlife MuseumLouisiana Sea Grant logo
7910 W. Park Avenue • Houma, LA 70364

AND DOCKSIDE
Houma Downtown Marina
Bayou Terrebonne & Gulf Intracoastal Waterway

oysters
WORKSHOP TOPICS INCLUDE:
  • Utilize GPS technology to locate oyster leases
  • Trip tickets
  • Weights & measures, defining a sack
  • Oyster cooler log time & temperature
  • Best management practices for oyster handling & waste disposal
  • Fisheries enforcement, common infractions

  • HANDS-ON DEMONSTRATIONS INCLUDE:
  • Raised floor air flow system
  • Calibrated basket
  • Best practices in separating oyster clusters

  • To register or for more information, contact:
    Julie Falgout (985) 856-2477  •  jfalgo@lsu.edu
    Alan Matherne (985) 677-0368  •  amatherne@lsu.edu

    John Supan, PhD (985) 264-3239  •  jsupan@lsu.edu


    Lunch follows dockside event, sponsored by  



    Dates Set for Louisiana Shrimp and Oyster Seasons

    LaTer Direct Administrator - Thursday, August 14, 2014
    OystersThe Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) has set the dates for Louisiana’s shrimp and oyster seasons. The dates were determined after input from LDWF biologists and the public.

    The Louisiana shrimp season will open one-half hour before sunrise on Monday, August 18 for inside waters from the western shore of the Atchafalaya River to the Louisiana border with Texas. State inside waters east of the Atchafalaya River will open for shrimping Monday, August 18 at 6 p.m.

    Some state waters are still closed, however, as a result of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. More information including maps showing the openings and closings can be found here.

    Oyster season will begin one-half hour before sunrise on Wednesday, September 3, in Little Lake, Barataria Bay, Deep Lake, Lake Tambour, and Vermilion/East and West Cote Blanche/Atchafalaya Bay Public Oyster Seed Grounds. Between September 3 and October 12, harvesting oysters for market sales is NOT allowed on any public oyster area and only seed oysters for bedding purposes may be harvested.

    On Monday, October 20, all other public oyster seed grounds Lake Borgne, Bay Junop, Lake Mechant, the Lake Machias/Fortuna sacking-only area, the Bay Long sacking-only area, and a sacking-only area in Mississippi Sound will be open for harvesting one-half hour before sunrise. The west cove portion of the Calcasieu Lake Public Oyster Area will open one-half hour before sunrise on Monday, October 27.

    There are a number of provisions as well as some closures regarding oyster season. For the full release from LDWF, click here.

    Shrimp Season Has Closed in Remainder of State Inside Waters Except for Breton and Chandeleur Sounds

    LaTer Direct Administrator - Tuesday, July 22, 2014

    The 2014 spring inshore shrimp season closed on Monday, July 21, in the remainder of state inside waters except for the open waters of Breton and Chandeleur Sounds and a portion of Mississippi Sound.

    This action closes shrimping in inside waters within the Mermentau, Calcasieu and Sabine Rivers Basins extending from the western shore of Freshwater Bayou Canal westward to the Louisiana/Texas state line and in Lake Borgne located in the Lake Pontchartrain Basin.

    Effective with this closure all state inside waters will be closed to shrimping except for the open waters of Breton and Chandeleur Sounds as described by the double–rig line in R.S. 56:495.1(A)2. Shrimping will also be allowed in that portion of Mississippi Sound as follows:

    that portion of Mississippi Sound beginning at a point on the Louisiana-Mississippi Lateral Boundary at 30 degrees 09 minutes 39.6 seconds north latitude and -89 degrees 30 minutes 00.0 seconds west longitude due south to a point at 30 degrees 05 minutes 00.0 seconds north latitude and -89 degrees 30 minutes 00.0 seconds west longitude; thence southeasterly to a point on the western shore of Three-Mile Pass at 30 degrees 03 minutes 00.0 seconds north latitude and -89 degrees 22 minutes 23.0 seconds west longitude; thence northeasterly to a point on Isle Au Pitre at 30 degrees 09 minutes 20.5 seconds north latitude and -89 degrees 11 minutes 15.5 seconds west longitude, which is a point on the double–rig line. All state outside waters seaward of the Inside/Outside shrimp line will remain open to shrimp harvesting until further notice, with the exception of those areas outlined in the map linked below. 

    For a larger map that details today’s actions and all areas currently open and closed to harvesting shrimp click here.

    Data collected in recent weeks by LDWF biologists indicate increased quantity, distribution and percentage of small, juvenile white shrimp within these waters. The decision to close these waters was made to protect these developing shrimp and provide opportunity for growth to larger and more marketable sizes.

    The Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission will meet August 7 to consider opening dates for the fall inshore shrimp season.

    LDWF Announces Opening of Spring Shrimp Season

    LaTer Direct Administrator - Thursday, May 01, 2014

    The dates for the 2014 Louisiana spring shrimp season were announced at today’s meeting of the Louisiana Wildlife and
    Fisheries Commission. The spring shrimp season was set based on information provided by Louisiana Department of
    Wildlife and Fisheries biologists and on public comments.

    The opening dates for the 2014 Louisiana shrimp season are as follows:

    1. That portion of state inside waters from the eastern shore of South Pass of the Mississippi River westward
    to the western shore of Freshwater Bayou Canal, and that portion of state outside waters extending 3
    nautical miles seaward from the shoreline from the Atchafalaya River Ship Channel at Eugene Island as
    delineated by the Channel red buoy line westward to the to the western shore of Freshwater Bayou Canal
    at -92 degrees 18 minutes 33 seconds west longitude to open at 6 a.m. May 26

    2. That portion of state inside waters from the Mississippi/Louisiana state line westward to the eastern shore
    of South Pass of the Mississippi River to open at 6 a.m. June 2. However, the open waters of Breton and
    Chandeleur Sounds as described by the double-rig line are currently open to shrimping.

    3. That portion of state inside waters from the western shore of Freshwater Bayou Canal westward to the
    Louisiana/Texas state line to open at 6 a.m. June 2.

    In addition to the open waters of Breton and Chandeleur Sounds, all state outside waters are currently open
    to shrimping except for outside waters extending 3 nautical miles seaward from the shoreline from the
    Atchafalaya River Ship Channel at Eugene Island westward to the to the western shore of Freshwater Bayou
    Canal.

    The Commission granted authority to the Secretary of the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries to delay or
    advance these opening dates if biological and technical data indicate the need to do so, and; to close any
    portion of Louisiana's inside waters to protect small juvenile white shrimp if biological and technical data
    indicate the need to do so, or enforcement problems develop. The Secretary is further granted the authority
    to open any area, or re-open any previously closed area, and to open and close special shrimp seasons in any
    portion of state waters.

    For more information, click here.

    Louisiana Seafood Academy and Dock Day 2014

    LaTer Direct Administrator - Tuesday, March 11, 2014

    Louisiana Direct Seafood Academy and Dock Day 2014 will be held in Delcambre, LA at the Shrimp Festival Building (411 Main Street, Delcambre, LA 70528) on Tuesday, March 25 and Wednesday, March 26. The meeting is free and open to all commercial fishermen including shrimpers, crabbers, oystermen and finfishermen, processors, and anyone else interested in the commercial fishing industry.

    Sponsored by Louisiana Sea Grant and LSU AgCenter, the event will feature presentations and demonstrations by experts from Louisiana Sea Grant, Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, LSU and the U.S. Coast Guard. Louisiana Direct Seafood Academy and Dock Day is conducted to provide education and information to commercial fisherman about the shrimp and crab industry.

    Topics to be covered on each day include: industry status and updates, research and development, compensation funds, sustainability and certification, gear technology, and safety regulation.

    The first meeting on March 25th will feature shrimp specific topics while the second meeting on March, 26th will highlight important crab information.

    The Dock Day for each day will feature several demonstrations:

    • Boat Gear Technology and Equipment
    • US Coast Guard Safety Demonstration
    • Tour of Local Shrimp Processing Facility (Day 1 Only)
    • Crab Shedding Demonstration (Day 2 Only)
    • Vacuum Packaging Demonstration following Recommended BMP
    • Free Local Hospital Health Screening (12:00pm – 3:00pm)

    Coffee and lunch will be provided to all participants. Also, random door prizes will be drawn amongst those who can show their Louisiana commercial fishing license.

    For more information about the program, contact Thu Bui at the LSU AgCenter at tbui@agcenter.lsu.edu or (337)828-4100 ext. 300.

    Click here to register now!

    Louisiana Saltwater Series

    LaTer Direct Administrator - Thursday, February 27, 2014
    The Louisiana Saltwater Series Redfish Series begins on March 8 at Boudreaux's Marina in Cocodrie, Louisiana. The series consists of seven competitive "catch and release" redfish tournaments. Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries uses data collected from the tournament to study the life and habitat of sport fish to enhance Louisiana's fisheries resources. Click here to see the locations of fish that have been tagged at past tournaments. 

    2014 Schedule:
    March 8 – Cocodrie, Boudreaux’s Marina;
    April 5 – Lake Charles, Calcasieu Point Landing;
    May 3 – Slidell, The Dock/Dockside Bait & Tackle;
    June 28 – Delacroix, Sweetwater Marina;
    July 19 – Port Fourchon, Port Fourchon Marina;
    August 23 – Empire, The Delta Marina; and
    September 13, – Seaway Marina, Lafitte

    Championship – October 17 and 18 Venice, Venice Marina

    For online registration and more info, check out: http://www.lasaltwaterseries.com/

    White Shrimp Season Opening August 12

    LaTer Direct Administrator - Thursday, August 01, 2013
    Today, the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission announced the 2013 fall inshore shrimp season.

    The season will open as follows:

    6 a.m., Monday August 12 - inside waters from the western shore of the Atchafalaya River and the Atchafalaya River Ship Channel westward to the Louisiana/Texas state line

    6 p.m., Monday, August 12 – state inside waters east of the Atchafalaya River

    The Commission set the season based on recommendations presented by Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries biologists and comments from the public. However, certain areas are still closed to commercial fishing and certain recreational fishing activities due to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Maps of the areas that remain closed to recreational and commercial fishing are posted to the LDWF website at www.wlf.louisiana.gov/oilspill.

    Preliminary Louisiana shrimp landings statistics provided by NOAA Fisheries Service indicate that approximately 26.1 million pounds of shrimp (all species combined/heads-off weight) were landed in Louisiana from January through May, 2013.

    For a map detailing today’s actions click here:

    The Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana's abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.louisiana.gov, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ldwffb, or follow us on Twitter @LDWF.

    For more information, contact Martin Bourgeois at (985) 594-4130 or mbourgeois@wlf.la.gov. For press inquiries, contact Laura Wooderson at lwooderson@wlf.la.gov or (504)430-2623.

    Shrimp Season to Close on July 4 for Most of Terrebonne Basin

    LaTer Direct Administrator - Friday, June 28, 2013
    Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries announced the 2013 spring inshore shrimp season will close at 6 a.m. on Thursday, July 4, in the Terrebonne Basin except for potions of lower Timbalier Bay, Terrebonne Bay, Lake Pelto and Pelican Lake that border the Gulf.

    Specifically, the inside waters within the Terrebonne Basin that will remain open to shrimping are bounded by the following coordinates: south of 29 degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds north latitude from 90 degrees 18 minutes 00 seconds west longitude westward to 90 degrees 34 minutes 00 seconds west longitude, and south of 29 degrees 07 minutes 00 seconds north latitude from 90 degrees 34 minutes 00 seconds west longitude westward to 90 degrees 50 minutes 30 seconds west longitude

    Data collected in recent weeks by LDWF biologists indicate increased quantity, distribution and percentage of small, juvenile white shrimp within these waters. The decision to close this area was made in an effort to protect these developing shrimp and provide opportunity for growth to larger and more marketable sizes.

    LDWF is extending the shrimp season in these lower coastal bays and lakes to provide shrimpers with added opportunities to harvest emigrating brown shrimp while limiting adverse impacts to developing white shrimp populations. However, if compliance among shrimpers with respect to these boundaries becomes a problem, LDWF will immediately close these waters to shrimping.

    For a map detailing these closures please click here:

    All remaining state inside waters, as well as all state outside waters seaward of the Inside/Outside shrimp line, will remain open to shrimp harvesting until further notice, with the exception of those areas still closed to recreational and commercial fishing due to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Maps of the areas still closed to recreational and commercial fishing are posted to the LDWF website at www.wlf.louisiana.gov/oilspill

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    Lafourche / Terrebonne Direct Seafood
    511 Roussell Street, Houma, LA, 70360
    Email: admin@laterdirectseafood.com 
    985-873-6495
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